How to go Surfing in Ontario

How to go Surfing in Ontario

Adriana SaboWednesday,22 April 2015

This Machine Kills Robots is a punk/surf band from Colchester/Windsor, Ontario, that plays some kick-ass music. This Machine Kills Robots are Justin Lariviere (guitar/banjo/vocals), Andy Robinet (guitar/vocals), Andrew Morgan (bass), Josh Gardner Costa (drums) and the energy this band has is truly amazing. One can’t find out too much about them, as they seem to exist somewhere on the margins – of their own free will or not, I can’t say. We know that they were founded in November 2011 and that they describe their music as Ontario Surf, which is quite interesting since, when someone says “Surf” most of us don’t immediately think “Canada!” Their latest album is titled simply  A History of Violent Crime in the Darkest Corners of the Ocean Floor 2015 and is a brilliant example of surf punk or progressive surf as they label it.

The album consists out of seven tracks: “Buried at Sea,” “Sea Fairies,” “Harbour House,” “October Wind,” “Dark Water,” “Dry Land is for the Dead” and “Light of the Deep” — which is something of a separate album within the album, consisting of five parts or, better yet, zones — “I. Sunlight Zone,” “II. Twilight Zone,” “III. Midnight Zone,” “IV. Abyssal Zone,” “V. Hadal Zone.”

What is so great about A History of Violent Crime in the Darkest Corners of the Ocean Floor 2015 is the fact that it has a mixture of a number of different energies that work together to make a great album. There is the distinct surf sound that makes you want to go surfing RIGHT THIS MINUTE, but a bit “enhanced” at times with the harsh sound of punk that makes you want to go surfing RIGHT THIS FU**ING MINUTE!!!! and heightens the general energetic level of the album. This is especially the case with “Harbour House” that moves dangerously close to the aggressive sound of hard core at the beginning, and then slowly into high pressure surf. This track is followed by “October Wind,” a song with vocals — the album is an instrumental, btw —  that starts with some unexpected a Capella harmonies, sung by Lariviere and Robinet, that later on move to the sphere of progressive surf. Another great track, “Dark Water,” follows “Harbour House,” introducing a somewhat more “folk-ish” sound with the starting riff that is, at the same time, unmistakably “surf.” An especially great effect is achieved through the use of banjo, whose specific sound paints this surf music in unexpected, almost exotic colors. But A History of Violent Crime in the Darkest Corners of the Ocean Floor 2015 starts meditatively, with an intro track that evokes lazy, sunny and at the same time a sad, melancholic atmosphere of the seaside. It then quickly picks up the pace, only to return to this meditative state with the final track.

Besides all these points, I must add that, thanks to the mixtures I mentioned, This Machine Kills Robots managed to shake up the genre of surf that tends to get boring after a while, since most songs have the same energy and lose their strength after you listen to five songs in a row.  A History of Violent Crime in the Darkest Corners of the Ocean Floor 2015 has a clear structure, a clear logic of development and a clear structural plan. Great job!

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