JUST BECAUSE YOU LIVE IN A STATE WITH SNOW DOESN’T MEAN YOU KNOW HOW TO DRIVE IN THE SNOW

JUST BECAUSE YOU LIVE IN A STATE WITH SNOW DOESN’T MEAN YOU KNOW HOW TO DRIVE IN THE SNOW

Matt HealeyFriday,27 December 2013

The Snap:

I live in New Hampshire (NH) now. NH is north, which means it snows. A lot. This year has been no exception. We have already had a few days of snow. Now, when I lived in Washington DC, I knew that the drives would be a disaster in the snow. But I figured now that I live in a place where snow is common, this would not be a problem.

The Download:

I was wrong. The drivers here are as much of a disaster in the snow as the drivers in DC. In a lot of ways, they are worse because at least DC drivers know they can not drive in the snow, so they don’t go out. They raid the grocery store the day before so they can have French Toast the morning of the snow (What else can you make with the things everyone buys when it is going to snow — bread, eggs, milk?). But in NH, they go out and then proceed to drive between 10-15 MPH on a straight road. Now, granted I believe that just because the car is going sideways doesn’t mean that it is out of control. It just means that it is going sideways. And as long as there is not something in the way, then all is good as it will straighten out sooner or later. I suspect that it is due to the feminization of American Culture, as explained by Bill Maher.

But it doesn’t end there. How come it is always the people with the biggest SUVs with the most snow and safety features that have the hardest time driving in the snow? If I was stuck behind a Jaugar F type or a Masarati GranTurissmo — both of which I want — I could understand the slow driving. But if you are in a giant SUV with AWD and you still can’t feel like you can go more than 2 MPH, then stay home.

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Hat Tips:

Bill Maher, Image Credit: Flickr



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