NSFW

Matt HealeyMonday,17 December 2012

The Snap:

“Irreverence. Perspective. Brevity. Contrarian Thinking.” When I agreed to write for this blog it was this description and the prospect of working with @shanebarnhill again that interested me. It still does and Shane has been very good about giving me total free reign to write what I want. He has made some very minor edits to some of my posts, mostly associated with the links. But I do find some things interesting. Specifically, a warning that was added to a post a while back. The warning was the the link in the “Can’t We Just Call It OCD Or Something Similar?” post. I am not complaining and I do not want him to stop doing what he currently is, it it did get me thinking.

The Download:

The link in question was a link to the TV program “My Strange Addiction.” Shane added “(Editors note: that link is gross).” He is right the link was gross. The show is gross. I can barley sit through the commercials for it. I added it because it showed how many different new addictions there were. Which was the point of the post, so I felt the link had merit. Similar to how the description of eating uni sushi in the intro to the ebook “The First 100 Posts on The Snap Download: The Quest For A Beer” (Shameless plug – NOW AVAILABLE ON AMAZON FOR ONLY 99 CENTS!) was off topic, but it provided an overview for a book that could be considered a collection of off topic posts, so it had merit. But what I found interesting was the the link merited a warning while the links in my post “Extraordinary People” did not need a warning. You can find those links here and here.

This does bring up a question. Clearly images like the ones in the Extraordinary People post would be considered inappropriate 50 years ago and would have required a warning. But now it does not. Has porn become so mainstream that it no longer requires the “NSFW” label? Are we at the point where we can recognize that porn has existed forever and is not all evil? There have been studies that the adult industry has been responsible for many of the advances in tech including the VCR, on-line payment systems used by most retail sites, and all of the streaming technology used by sites like YouTube and Hulu. So there is a benefit to the desire for this type of content. Whether it outweighs the cost depends on what you think the costs are. Further, it is becoming more acceptable to discuss porn. There was a recent debate in The New York Times’ Room for Debate section under the title “Should Porn Come Out of The Closet?” Regardless, we have come a long way.

Hat Tips:

Tech advances due to pornNYT, Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

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